Mayor Michael Hancock on Thursday announced the five people who will help pick Denver's next police watchdog.

The Office of the Independent Monitor was created in 2005 to monitor internal investigations of police officers and sheriff's deputies and make recommendations on discipline. It was created after two controversial police shootings.

The first monitor, Richard Rosenthal, was sometimes at odds with the Denver Police Department. Many officers and safety officials believed he overstepped his role, while supporters said his tough approach was just what was needed.

Rosenthal left early this month to head an independent investigations office in British Columbia. In a parting shot, Rosenthal accused police internal-affairs officers of bias in investigating misconduct by cops and said the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice should investigate the Police Department.

In a statement announcing the five-member screening panel, Hancock said, "We will ensure there is a robust public input process to appoint a dynamic leader who will help to improve transparency, accountability and public confidence in our safety departments."

The members of the screening committee are:

  • Mary Davis, president of the Citizen Oversight Board.

  • City Councilman Paul Lopez, from District 3.

  • Denver County Court Judge Claudia Jordan.

  • Nita Mosby Henry, director of the Career Service Authority.

  • Dr. Joseph Sandoval, a professor at Metropolitan State College of Denver.

    The mayor chose two members. One had to be a current or retired judge, and the other someone with "extensive knowledge of internal police investigations or the monitoring of internal police investigations."

    Hancock selected Jordan and Sandoval. Lopez was picked by the City Council president, and the other two are on the committee by statute.

    The committee will work with the Career Service Authority. After screening applicants from across the U.S., the authority will provide the committee with a list of applicants.

    With public comment, the committee will pick up to three finalists. Hancock will then select the monitor, whose appointment must be approved by the City Council.